What role should the Performance Architect play in an Enterprise Process Improvement project?

Posted by Tom Dwyer on Friday, February 12, 2010 - 12:58

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What should be the working relationship among the process owner, business architect, enterprise architect, performance architect and business process analyst?

Has anyone used a performance architect either as an outside consultant or as a salaried employee?

Is the performance architect role part of the business architect’s job function?

What challenges existed when performing this role and how were they overcome? What benefits did the performance architect provide to the project?

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Ken Mullins
,
posted 6 years 50 weeks ago
The role of the Performance Architect in an Enterprise Process Improvement initiative is to play the "bad cop," if you will, to ensure that the project delivers on the promise of the investments made in it. From the start, the Performance Architect should work to obtain agreeement not so much on what needs to be done (that can be left to the BPMers or the Business Architects), but on how measures of success will be established for the initiative, how can they be made measureable, how they will be measured, and then ensuring that the measurements are actually taken at the prescibed frequencies, and then used to make appropriate course corrections over the lifecycle of the initiative. Of course, the Performance Architect should simultaneously ensure that performance metrics remain (demonstrably) aligned with the strategic goals and objectives of the larger enterprise, business unit/ domain, etc. [Updated on 5/3/2010 2:07 PM]
Shelley Sweet
,
posted 7 years 9 weeks ago
I want to build on what Tricia said. I think the Performance Architect needs to know about load and stress testing for the system, but equally important is to be able to help process owners and business people identify measures that are useful for the process, and use the data from the measures to help others make decisions and take action.
Tricia Johnstone
,
posted 7 years 9 weeks ago
My team includes responsibilities for Strategic Planning, Enterprise Risk, Enterprise Performance Management, Business Continuity Planning, Business Process and Improvement. Each of these disciplines has one or two FTEs focusing on the strategic direction for their program, maintaining alignment with the other programs as well as developing and executing tactical plans for the year against our roadmap. For Performance Management in particular, it is extremely helpful to have someone hyper-focusing on this area to drive vision as well as detailed specifications. She works closely with all of us so we can leverage her work and vice-versa. Generally the detailed specifications need to be worked out outside of our working sessions and she's able to carve out the time to work one-on-one with the correct resources who are familiar with the data. Without her- I believe we would have the vision but we would struggle with the execution.

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